Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatment, Diet, and More

Exercise and Type 2 diabetes

One of the most undemanding and the most workable ways to knock over blood sugar amount, eliminate the dangers of “cardiovascular disease,” and perk up health and welfare in general is exercise.

In spite of that, in today’s inactive world where almost every indispensable job can be carried out online, from the ergonomic chair in front of a computer, or with a streaming line of messages from a fax machine, exercising can be a hard argument to win over.

Type 2 Diabetes

The Weight of Exercise

Everyone should exercise, yet the health experts tells us that only 30% of the United States population gets the recommended thirty minutes of daily physical activity, and 25% are not active at all. In fact, inactivity is thought to be one of the key reasons for the surge of Type 2 diabetes in the U.S., because inactivity and obesity promote insulin resistance.

The good news is that it is never too late to get moving, and exercise is one of the easiest ways to start controlling your diabetes. For people with Type 2 diabetes in particular, exercise can improve insulin sensitivity, lower the risk of heart disease, and promote weight loss.

Type 2 diabetes

Diabetes is on the rise. The number of people diagnosed with diabetes every year increased by 48% between 1980 and 1994. Nearly all the new cases are Type 2 diabetes, or adult-onset, the kind that moves in around middle age. Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes include increased thirst, appetite, and need to urinate; feeling tired, edgy, or sick to the stomach; blurred vision; tingling or loss of feeling in the hands.

Diabetes Treatment

The causes of Type 2 diabetes are complex and not completely understood, although research is uncovering new clues at a rapid pace.

However, it has already been proven that one of the reasons for the boom in Type 2 diabetes is the widening of waistbands and the trend toward a more deskbound and inactive lifestyle in the United States and other developed countries. In America, the shift has been striking; in the 1990s alone, obesity increased by 61% and diagnosed diabetes by 49%.

For this reason, health experts encourage those who already have Type 2 diabetes to start employing the wonders that exercise can do for them. Without exercise, people have the tendency to become obese. Once they are obese, they have bigger chances of accumulating Type 2 diabetes.

Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that over 80% of people with Type 2 diabetes are clinically overweight. Therefore, it is high time that people, whether inflicted with Type 2 diabetes or not, should start doing those jumping and stretching activities.

Diabetes Symptoms

Getting Started

The first order of business with any exercise plan, especially if you are a “dyed-in-the-wool” sluggish, is to consult with your health care provider. If you have cardiac risk factors, the health care provider may want to perform a stress test to establish a safe level of exercise for you.

Certain diabetic complications will also dictate what type of exercise program you can take on. Activities like weightlifting, jogging, or high-impact aerobics can possibly pose a risk for people with diabetic retinopathy due to the risk for further blood vessel damage and possible retinal detachment.

 

If you are already active in sports or work out regularly, it will still benefit you to discuss your regular routine with your doctor. If you are taking insulin, you may need to take special precautions to prevent hypoglycemia during your workout.

Start Slow

For those who have Type 2 diabetes, your exercise routine can be as simple as a brisk nightly neighborhood walk. If you have not been very active before now, start slowly and work your way up. Walk the dog or get out in the yard and rake. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Park in the back of the lot and walk. Every little bit does work, in fact, it really helps a lot.

As little as 15 to 30 minutes of daily, heart-pumping exercise can make a big difference in your blood glucose control and your risk of developing diabetic complications. One of the easiest and least expensive ways of getting moving is to start a walking program. All you need is a good pair of well-fitting, supportive shoes and a direction to head in.

Indeed, you do not have to waste too many expenses on costly “health club memberships,” or the most up-to-date health device to start pumping those fats out. What you need is the willingness and the determination to start exercising to a healthier, Type 2 diabetes-free life. The results would be the sweetest rewards from the effort that you have exerted.

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Step It Up To Get It Down

If you or a loved one has type 2 diabetes, you're not alone. More than 18 million Americans have type 2 diabetes.

For many people with type 2 diabetes, controlling blood sugar is a struggle every day. In fact, a report issued last year by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) showed that two out of three Americans with type 2 diabetes analyzed in a study were not in control of their blood sugar.

It is important to control blood sugar because it lowers the risk of serious health problems later. Diabetes can cause heart disease, stroke, blindness, loss of limbs and kidney disease.

But now, there's new help to better manage type 2 diabetes. Life and fitness coach Bob Harper of NBC's "The Biggest Loser" and a panel of diabetes experts created easy-to-understand and motivational steps people can take to get their blood sugar down. They are called 6.5 Steps Toward Better Blood Sugar Control. These steps are different because they can fit easily into everyday living.

"Through my years of coaching and training, I've worked with many people with type 2 diabetes and have seen how hard it can be to live with this disease," said Bob Harper. "But I learned that anyone can change their life. It's all about finding the right tools and motivation. I urge people with type 2 diabetes to step it up and use the 6.5 Steps and make them a part of their daily lives."

The 6.5 Steps can help people with type 2 diabetes every day because they focus on the basics of diabetes management: eating healthy, being physically active, monitoring blood sugar and, when appropriate, taking one or more medicines. These all play a part to help lower blood sugar.

Healthy Eating: Healthy eating reduces the risk for complications such as heart disease and stroke. Good choices include many foods, such as vegetables, whole grains, fruits, nonfat dairy products, beans, and lean meats, poultry and fish. There is no one perfect food, but watching portion sizes is key to a healthy diet.

Physical Activity: Regular physical activity can lower blood sugar levels. It can also help manage weight and reduce the risk of developing heart disease and high blood pressure. There are little things people with type 2 diabetes can do every day to be more active, such as walking with a friend or taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

Blood Sugar Monitoring: There are two tests for checking blood sugar. One test is the blood sugar monitoring that patients do on their own. It gives people with diabetes a check of their blood sugar level at the time the test is taken. The other one is called the A1C test. The A1C test shows a person's average blood sugar levels over the previous two to three months. Experts say that a good A1C goal is 6.5 percent or less for most people with type 2 diabetes.

Medicines: Most people with type 2 diabetes take medicine to help control their blood sugar levels. Many need more than one medicine to help treat the disease in different ways.

For people with type 2 diabetes, it is important that they team up with their doctor or other health care professional and think of them as a partner. They should work with their health care team to make a plan to get their blood sugar under control.

All About Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Types.

While talking about diabetes, you may be frightened from the idea that you may have it. Or maybe, you may have it in the future. You want to know if you are at risk to develop diabetes and anxiously you're looking to find if you have any diabetes symptom.

Diabetes affects the manner in which the body handles carbohydrates, fats and proteins. If neglected, diabetes can have serious complications. The diabetic people have high blood sugar level. The blood sugar level is regulated by insulin - a hormone produced by the pancreas, which depends on your eating habits.

Diabetes is a serious disease. But the startling truth is that diabetes is reversible. Diabetes is the number one cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This disease is a condition where the body is unable to automatically regulate blood glucose levels, resulting in too much glucose (a sugar) in the blood. Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects as many as 16 million Americans.

Actually, there is no clear symptom for diabetes. The most common symptoms of diabetes are as follow:

- being all the time thirsty
- frequent urination
- increased hunger
- feeling all the time tired; having an excessive fatigue,

On the other hand, there are some other symptoms of diabetes that are prescribed as diabetes complications in fact. These symptoms are:

- vision changes;
- recurrent skin infections very difficult to heal;
- tingling or numbness you may feel in your extremities;
- gums disorders;
- Hair loss and many others.

There are different types of diabetes.

Type I Diabetes (juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes): The reason for type I diabetes is due to pancreas unability to produce insulin.

Type II Diabetes (non insulin dependent diabetes or adult onset diabetes): This diabetes is a result of body tissues becoming resistant to insulin. It is usually hereditary.

Type 2 Diabetes is more common than Type 1 Diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a life-long disease marked by high levels of sugar in the blood. Conditions associated with type 2 diabetes include hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. Type 2 diabetes may account for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Up to two-thirds of people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Obesity is the single most important risk factor for type 2 diabetes. An estimated 20% of all cases of new onset type 2 diabetes are in individuals between the ages of 9-19. The more you know about type 2 diabetes, the more you'll be able to take the right steps to take control of your condition.

If neglected, diabetes can lead to various complications such as damage to the kidneys, heart disease, nerve damage, hypoglycemia (drastic reduction in glucose levels). Diabetes is a serious disease and there is no treatment of it. However, it can be brought under control by proper diabet diet.

What Is Type Diabetes Mellitus?

The number of people around the world suffering from diabetes has skyrocketed in the last two decades, from 30 million to 230 million, claiming millions of lives and severely taxing the ability of health care systemsto deal with the epidemic, according to data released Saturday by the International Diabetes Federation.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease in which your body cannot properly store and use body cell fuel for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as breads, cereals, pasta, rice, potatoes, fruits and some vegetables. To use glucose, your body needs insulin. Insulin is made by a gland in your body called the pancreas. There are three types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes only occurs during pregnancy.

Types of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous clinical disorder with numerous causes. Two main classifications of diabetes mellitus exist, idiopathic and secondary.

Idiopathic diabetes is divided into two main types; insulin dependent and non-insulin-depenedent. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, IDDM (Type 1) is defined by the development of ketoacidosis in the absence of insulin therapy. Type 1 diabetes most often manifests in childhood (hence also called juvenile onset diabetes) and is the result of an autoimmune destruction of the b-cells of the pancreas. Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM (Type 2) is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia but rarely leads to ketoacidosis. Type 2 diabetes generally manifests after age 40 and therefore has the obsolete name of adult onset-type diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can result from genetics defects that cause both insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. There are two main forms of type 2 diabetes:

1. Late onset associated with obesity.
2. Late onset not associated with obesity.

Sample meal plan

Choose foods you like and which satisfy you, and include carbohydrate foods in each meal or snack to help manage blood glucose levels. You can eat your main meal at lunch or dinner.

Get help immediately if Diabetes symptoms occur

Occasionally, the onset of diabetes - particularly Type 1 - can be abrupt. It can lead to a condition called 'keto acidosis', which is a medical emergency. The symptoms of this condition are loss of appetite, weight loss, vomiting, excessive passing of urine, altered consciousness and, finally, coma. Seek medical help immediately if these symptoms occur.

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form found in the US.
Ninety to ninety-five percent of people diagnosed with
diabetes have this type.

Usually developed later in life, it is most commonly
diagnosed in people over the age of fifty-five, but in many
cases as young as forty or even younger.

This is because eighty percent of people diagnosed with
type 2 diabetes are overweight. With obesity at an all time
high, the diagnoses for type 2 diabetes is also at an all
time high. Alpha-lipoic acid supplements may help.

In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is still producing
insulin, but for some unknown reason, the body is not able
to utilize it effectively. As a result, just as in type 1
diabetes, type 2 people develop a dangerous buildup of
glucose in the blood and the body is not able to utilize it
for fuel.

People who have type 2 diabetes may see their symptoms
develop over time. They are not usually as noticeable as
the type 1 symptoms.

Symptoms include fatigue, frequent urination, especially
throughout the night hours, unusual thirst, weight loss,
frequent infections, high blood pressure and slow healing sores.

In fact, sores may never heal and if not treated it is common for people to have limbs amputated. With high blood pressure this usually occurs in the legs, feet and toes.

Also as with type 1, if the high blood pressure symptoms go untreated and
insulin is not administered when necessary, the patient
runs the risk of slipping into a diabetic coma, which can
be fatal.

type 2 diabetes

It is important if you have any symptoms of type 1 or 2
diabetes you speak with a health professional and get
tested for high blood pressure and low blood pressure..

Four Types Of Diabetes! Which Are You?

Type 1 diabetes
Results from the body's failure to produce insulin, the hormone that unlocks the cells of the body, allowing glucose to enter and fuel them. It is estimated that 5-10% of Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 1 diabetes.

Having type 1 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 1 diabetes include: heart disease (cardiovascular disease), blindness (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), and kidney damage (nephropathy).

Type 2 diabetes
Results from insulin resistance (a condition in which the body fails to properly use insulin), combined with relative insulin deficiency. Most Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.

Having type 2 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 2 diabetes include: heart disease (cardiovascular disease), blindness (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), and kidney damage (nephropathy). Learn more about these complications and how to cope with them.

Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes affects about 4% of all pregnant women - about 135,000 cases in the United States each year.

Because gestational diabetes can hurt you and your baby, you need to start treatment quickly. Treatment for gestational diabetes aims to keep blood glucose levels equal to those of pregnant women who don't have gestational diabetes. Treatment for gestational diabetes always includes special meal plans and scheduled physical activity. It may also include daily blood glucose testing and insulin injections. You will need help from your doctor, nurse educator, and other members of your health care team so that your treatment for gestational diabetes can be changed as needed.

For the mother-to-be, treatment for gestational diabetes helps lower the risk of a cesarean section birth that very large babies may require. Sticking with your treatment for gestational diabetes will give you a healthy pregnancy and birth, and may help your baby avoid future poor health. (see Diabetes Symptoms)

Pre-diabetes
Pre-diabetes is a condition that occurs when a person's blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. There are 41 million Americans who have pre-diabetes, in addition to the 20.8 million with diabetes.

Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 Weight Loss Nutrition

If you have diabetes you have to be very careful about what you eat. You need to take extra care in managing your blood glucose levels. You can do this by eating healthy, watching your diet, taking medication prescribed by a physician and getting proper exercise.

What foods should you eat? There is a food pyramid for people with diabetes. The Diabetes Food Pyramid divides food into six groups. At the top of the list is fats sweets and alcohol. Since this is the smallest group this tells you to eat very little from this section. The next group is milk, meat, meat substitutes and other proteins. On the pyramid 2 to 3 servings of milk is suggested and 4 to 6oz of meat/protein is mentioned. Then you have your vegetables and fruits. Veggies choose at least 3-5 servings per day and fruits choose at least 2-4 servings a day. The last group which you should eat the most of is breads grains and other starches. You can check with your doctor to get a copy of the diabetes food pyramid to learn more about the correct servings and portion sizes for you.

What is Type 1 Diabetes? This type of diabetes was previously known as juvenile diabetes and is typically diagnosed in children and young adults. The body does not produce insulin. What is insulin? It is a hormone needed to convert starches, sugar (glucose) and other foods into energy. Energy is needed for daily life activities. Type I Diabetes is a chronic condition with no cure, but the outlook for people living with this disease is far better than it was 20 years ago. There has been much advancement in medicine, research and patient education reducing disabling complications and extended the expectancies of life to those without diabetes. In other words people with diabetes 1 can live just as long as people without diabetes with the proper treatment and educating themselves on this disease.

What is Type 2 Diabetes? With type 2 the body does not produce enough insulin or the cell just simply ignores the insulin. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes. You need insulin in order for the body to be able to use sugar. The basic fuel for your cells is sugar. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose does not go into the cells but builds up in the blood instead it can cause problems. The problems it can cause are over time high glucose levels could hurt your heart, kidneys, nerves and eyes. What are the most common symptoms for adults with Type II Diabetes? The answer is fatigue, blurred vision, thirst and excessive urination. Do you think you may be diabetic? Check with your doctor. With type II diabetes minor weight loss can greatly improve your blood glucose levels.

So remember if you have diabetes please be under a doctors care. Watch what you eat. Limit your sweets, fats and alcohol. You can still eat good tasting foods and there are many diabetic food recipes on the internet. Get on a doctor approved exercise program and keep track of your glucose levels. Learn all you can about your condition so you can take control of it instead of the disease controlling you.

Lifestyle Changes For Coping With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes information is essential in patients who have either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. When diagnosed with diabetes, the health implications can be devastating but understanding what the disease is and what changes you can implement to assist in leading a healthy life is important in controlling any ill effects. Making a few lifestyle changes and ensuring you have regular doctor checkups to monitor your progress is important in maintaining a healthy life. With a few simple changes you can enhance the quality as well as the length of life.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes that is diagnosed in people today. Many older people, past the age of thirty, are diagnosed with this condition. It is much rarer to see this in children and teens, though it does occur. The condition is based on the body not producing enough insulin or rejecting the insulin that is produced. Type 2 diabetes and health is a somewhat complicated course to navigate but a healthy diabetes diet and continual monitoring from your physician, you can decrease your risks of additional complications. Learning to live with this disease is tantamount in upholding your overall health and well being. Complications from type 2 diabetes include increasing your chances of heart disease and kidney disease, complications involving your eye sight, foot and skin problems and increased risk of stroke. These risks can be reduced, though.

Type 1 diabetes mellitus is generally diagnosed in children and young adults and is not as prevalent in older people. The term also used to be known as juvenile diabetes. This is where insulin is not produced in the body. Metabolism in diabetes mellitus plays a large part. However, there are lifestyle changes that can occur, including diet, that will help better control the effects and lessen the risk of more serious complications. Complications and additional health risks are similar to those of type 2 diabetes and include heart, nerve, muscular, skin and eye problems.

Exercise is one of the important lifestyle changes that should occur if you are diagnosed with diabetes. Exercise should be a regular activity in everyone’s life and there is no denying the benefits that can be gained from it. With diabetes, though, it is especially important to remain active. First, exercise will promote weight loss and will also kick start the metabolism. Both will allow your body to be more sensitive to the insulin that is produced in the body. Ensuring you start an exercise program if you do not yet have one is very important. Check with your doctor before embarking on anything, though, to ensure your activities match your fitness level. Walking, swimming and using a trampoline are good, low impact exercises that can help.

You will need to become educated about the different food groups and which foods have various characteristics. Your physician or a nutrition specialist will be able to assist you with this and give you lists of which types of foods are in each category. Eating foods that digest slower will help you reduce the after meal spike that sometimes occurs. Carbohydrates are a key element in the diabetes diet and will help control the after-meal spikes that occur in diabetics. Adjusting the amount of fatty foods you consume is also an important aspect of maintaining a healthy diabetes diet. It not only will help reduce calories, thus allowing you to lose weight but will also help you process the insulin produced in your body.

It often helps diabetics to eat more often as opposed to eating breakfast, lunch and dinner. Eating smaller portions of food more frequently can often give a more even feeling and keep insulin levels steadier throughout the day. If you are prescribed medications, either oral medications or insulin shots, it is important to take them per the physician’s directions. Do not skip or delay medications. Also, if you are supposed to test, always test daily, as your physician recommends or anytime you are feeling a bit low.

Getting all the diabetes information available on what it is and how to control it with a diabetes diet and exercise is important in ensuring you lead a happy, healthy life. People with diabetes can lead very good, long lasting lives with some simply changes in lifestyle and diet. After changes become habit, there will be no sense of deprivation. You will feel better, lose weight and be more active. Your risks of more severe complications will decrease significantly and your chances of living longer will increase.

  • Diabetes Treatment
    Proper diet and exercise is always important when it comes to getting a handle on your diabetes treatment, but there's a lot more than that you need to...
  • Diabetes Health Insurance
    A lot of people believe that they cannot live a normal life or get diabetes health insurance after they get diagnosed as having diabetes. The tips in...
  • Managing Diabetes
    Managing Diabetes can affect your well being in general. These diabetes articles explores the steps you can take to help keep you healthy...
  • Life Insurance Diabetes
    Learning to cope with diabetes and life insurance diabetes can be a trial at the start. These diabetes articles explores ideas on learning to live...
  • Diabetes Insulin
    There are so many things to consider when managing your diabetes insulin that you may not know where to start. Your road to a healthy life can be made...
  • Diabetes Treatments
    There are several types of diabetes treatments including medicines, insulin treatments, surgery, alternative treatments, and lifestyle changes.
  • Treatments For Diabetes
    What Are The Treatments For Diabetes? Diabetes will be the inability of the physique to procedure sugar in the blood. This has many implications for...

 

 

Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatment, Diet, and More
Diabetes Treatment
Diabetes Health Insurance
Managing Diabetes
Life Insurance Diabetes
Diabetes Insulin
Diabetes Treatments
Treatments For Diabetes
Contact